Quarterback Commandment No. 11

July 29, 2009 at 10:04 am | Posted in Quarterback Commandments | 5 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The year following Bill Parcells’s departure as Head Coach for the Cowboys, Dallas defeated Buffalo in a Monday night game. During the broadcast, Parcells appeared on camera and read the list of “Eleven Quarterback Commandments” he had given to Tony Romo to help him understand his job, and to further his development. I have been posting the 11 Quarterback Commandments, one at a time, and have tried to draw a spiritual, Biblical application for each one. Today, I have reached No. 11.

Quarterback Commandment No. 11: Don’t be a celebrity quarterback. We don’t need any of those. We need battlefield commanders that are willing to fight it out, every day, every week, and every season, and lead their team to win after win after win.

Spiritual Application: Christian ministers are not to seek glory for themselves. The Christian life is a race and a battle and a pilgrimage, not a parade or an awards banquet.

When the Dallas Cowboys win a game, I like to watch the post-game festivities. One feature I try to catch is the press conference. The head coach and different players will often take the podium, and answer questions, and bask in the spotlight. The main attraction of the post-game press conference, however, is usually the winning team’s quarterback. A team’s quarterback, especially if he is considered a “franchise quarterback” (one around which the rest of the team is built, and on whom the future success of the team is largely staked), is said to be “the face of the team.”

Parcells is rightfully wary of this. Celebrities tend to be famous for how they look. Heroes are famous for what they have done.

King David was a hero. His son, Absalom, was a celebrity. Christian ministers would do well to model their lives and ministries on Biblical heroes such as David, Stephen, and Paul.

Take the Apostle Paul. He was a “battlefield commander” who was willing to “fight it out” every day.

But even after that we had suffered before, and were shamefully entreated, as ye know, at Philippi, we were bold in our God to speak unto you the gospel of God with much contention.

I Thessalonians 2:2

However, he did not do this to gain a celebrity status, nor to make himself recognizable or famous among men.

Nor of men sought we glory, neither of you, nor yet of others, when we might have been burdensome, as the apostles of Christ.

I Thessalonians 2:6

An NFL quarterback should know the responsibility that comes with being recognizable. However, he must beware of having a “prima donna” attitude that would take his focus off his job, or engender jealousy in his teammates.

A Christian minister must be mindful that, while he leads, he will receive honor according to the victories the Lord uses him to win. However, this honor must not be allowed to stray into the area of celebrity. A Christian minister may be a leading soldier in the battle of the Christian life, but He still serves a Commander Who is over him. This Commander reminds us not to get ourselves enmeshed in this world’s false ideas of leadership, to the point where we forget to serve, and expect to be served.

Thou therefore endure hardness, as a good soldier of Jesus Christ. No man that warreth entangleth himself with the affairs of this life; that he may please him who hath chosen him to be a soldier.

II Timothy 2:3-4

Advertisements

5 Comments »

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

  1. […] the civilians back home. Soldiers are concerned with staying alive, keeping each other alive, and winning a battle. But they are not usually in the battle because they have been personally insulted by their enemy. […]

  2. […] Spiritual Application: Christian ministers are not to seek glory for themselves. The Christian life is a race and battle and a pilgrimage, not a parade or an awards banquet. A Christian minister may be a leading soldier in the battle of the Christian life, but He still serves a Commander Who is over him. This Commander reminds us not to get ourselves enmeshed in this world’s false ideas of leadership, to the point where we forget to serve, and expect to be served. (I Thessalonians 2:2, 6; II Timothy 2:3-4) Share this:ShareFacebookEmailDiggTwitterLinkedInRedditTumblrStumbleUponLike this:LikeBe the first to like this. […]

  3. […] If we’re blessed with fame, we need to be awake and active. And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out […]

  4. […] hard at your secular job, then work hard for Jesus; don’t be a secular quitter, and don’t be a spiritual quitter. When the going gets tough, the tough get going. Did Jesus ever give up? Of course […]

  5. […] Running in place or shadow boxing are handy for warming up before an earthly race or fight, but, in spiritual matters, we are not supposed to be playing games. We are affecting the lives of others for the sake of Christ. As fallen sinners, we may expect to encounter our share of relational drama, petty gossiping, even bickering, in-fighting, and childish squabbling, but Christ commands us to be victorious over those things. Our race is well underway, and we don’t have time to play around. We’re going to see King Jesus in a few days, and we don’t want to be ashamed or regretful. […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Entries and comments feeds.

%d bloggers like this: