Why Parables?

October 26, 2009 at 11:30 am | Posted in Matthew, parables | 10 Comments
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By reading the true historical and inspired accounts of the life of Jesus in the Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), you will notice how frequently the Lord taught in parables.

And the disciples came, and said unto him, Why speakest thou unto them in parables?

Matthew 13:10

The word “parable” comes from two ancient words: para, meaning “alongside;” and bole, meaning “to throw.” Literally, a “parable” is two different topics thrown alongside each other so they can be compared or contrasted for the purpose of greater enlightenment. In the 21st Century we are guilty of laziness, and our more common forms of the parable are the simile and the metaphor. We may say, “Kay was as mad as a hornet,” or, “Bob is just a couch potato.” These forms of speech sketch a picture, but they pale in comparison to the richness of Bible parables, which not only sketch the outside of a lesson, but vividly paint it in living words.

Christ’s parables are, in a sense, like the keys to a mansion. Mansions look interesting from the outside, but the keys allow us to go inside, spend time, explore, and closely investigate. Jesus invited those whose spiritual sight and hearing were growing dim and dull to become interested and excited, and to examine the things they knew about the world while those things are “thrown alongside” the principles of the Kingdom of God.

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  1. […] – To “allege” means to take two ideas and lay them alongside each other for comparison or contrast. Paul showed his listeners that what He was claiming about Jesus matched up to what the Bible […]

  2. […] in this Verse is “Parakletos.” It means “a helper who comes alongside and an advocate who stands beside you and speaks on your […]

  3. […] or a husbandmen given stewardship over a “vineyard” known as Egypt. Jesus taught a parable about how the Jewish religious leaders had rebelled against Him, and it is interesting to note some […]

  4. […] The Pharisees wanted to evaluate His Words or find fault with Him so they could accuse Him. His parables made sense to those who were ready to receive the […]

  5. […] Greek word translated as Comforter is parakletos, and it means someone who comes alongside (para) and helps (kletos). One way to describe is that a parakletos is like a soldier who helps his […]

  6. […] or “hearing” are used 21 or 22 times in Matthew 13, as Jesus taught in parables, giving ordinary examples to help us understand an extraordinary […]

  7. […] Matthew, we see the King teaching His closest followers. The teaching vehicle He chose was that of the parable. These parables were earthly illustrations containing spiritual lessons. They revealed truth to […]

  8. […] parables had the power to hide truth and reveal truth at the same time, depending on the condition of the […]

  9. […] (Matthew 11:15-20) 26. Hearing What the King Says (Matthew 12-13) 27. Hearts of Stone (Matthew 13) 28. Why Parables (Matthew 13:10) 29. Wake Up to the Word (Matthew 13:11-16) 30. Things New and Old (Matthew […]

  10. […] taught in parables, and, though some of the crowds that heard Him would have tried to judge the parables, the truth is […]


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