The Consequences of Forgiven Sins

January 18, 2010 at 9:46 am | Posted in Uncategorized | 10 Comments
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David’s sins had been great. Looking with lust upon Bathsheba, he soon found himself involved in adultery, murder, and lying. David repented, and the Lord was faithful to forgive, but David was learning the harsh realities of the consequences of forgiven sins.

Bathsheba had given birth to a child who had no name, but the child was due to be circumcised on the eighth day after his birth. David spent six days in fasting and prayer, asking God to suspend His principle of sowing and reaping. But on the seventh day the child died.

And it came to pass on the seventh day, that the child died. And the servants of David feared to tell him that the child was dead: for they said, Behold, while the child was yet alive, we spake unto him, and he would not hearken unto our voice: how will he then vex himself, if we tell him that the child is dead? But when David saw that his servants whispered, David perceived that the child was dead: therefore David said unto his servants, Is the child dead? And they said, He is dead.

II Samuel 12:18-19

This was not to be the end of David’s chastening, but it was a key moment in David’s walk of faith. Rather than turning from the Lord, he continued to turn to the Lord. Bathsheba also received forgiveness from God, for we find her in the genealogical line of Christ. In II Samuel 12:15 she is called “Uriah’s wife.” Uriah was the man whose death David had arranged so he could have Bathsheba for himself. However, in Verse 25 Bathsheba is referred to as David’s wife.

When God chastens His children, the chastening can seem harsh and severe. But we know He chastens in love. Christians who have stumbled, and then have sought and received the Lord’s forgiveness, must not be discouraged if there are consequences to their sins which still must be dealt with. God does not always deliver tidy explanations, but He does give dependable promises.

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  1. […] grammar in this expression, it correctly captures the idea of David’s plea. Grievous sin has grievous consequences, but for those who come to God by faith in Jesus Christ and His work on the Cross, the Lord will […]

  2. […] Old Testament patriarchs had multiple wives and appeared to be blessed: Jacob, David, some of the kings of Israel and […]

  3. […] of Solomon. King David’s most well-known sin was his affair with Bathsheba and its murderous consequences, but what is often overlooked is that after David was given Saul’s daughter, Michal, as his […]

  4. […] “a time to weep.” Sometimes we weep for joy, sometimes for grief. Sometimes we weep in repentance over sin. And there is “a time to laugh.” (When your Sunday School teacher tells a joke, go […]

  5. […] suffering. The suffering was a form of discipline used by God. The suffering in this case was the result of sin. And the LORD sent Nathan unto David. And he came unto him, and said unto him, There were […]

  6. […] to be cleansed from our iniquities before the face of God, we need to be willing to submit to His chastening. For Christians, God is more than willing to wash our clothes, but we’ve got to be willing to […]

  7. […] of God allowing the wicked to reap what they have sown, and even sending calamities and death to specific individuals and large groups of people. We don’t like to think of God having the power to spare a young child […]

  8. […] knew the job was not finished. He still refused to sugarcoat their sin, because he knew there are consequences to even forgiven sin. In Exodus 32:30 the Holy Spirit has recorded the words of Moses – not as a prophetic […]

  9. […] Slandering God is slandering His Word. It is living as though what He has said will not come to pass. It is living as if disobedience will produce no consequences. […]

  10. […] wrath” of God. What he was actually experiencing was the chastisement of His loving God, which, although no doubt severe, is done out of kindness, with the goal of correction, the way a good father disciplines his son, […]


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