Spurgeon Exhorts You to S.W.I.M. NOW

September 20, 2011 at 9:49 am | Posted in Quotes | 2 Comments
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I want you to remember, too, that you are called to come now, at once. You may not be bidden to come tomorrow for several reasons: you may not be alive, or there may be no earnest person near to invite you. Can there be a better day [than] today? You have always said “Tomorrow,” yet where are you now? Not a bit forwarder some of you than you were ten years ago. Do you recollect that sermon when you were made to tremble so, and you said, “Please God, if I get out of this, I will seek His face,” but you postponed it, and are you any forwarder now? You remember the story of the countryman who would not cross the river just yet, but sat down and said he would wait until all the water had gone by. He waited long in vain, and might have waited forever, for rivers are always flowing. You too are waiting till a more convenient season shall come, and all the difficulties have gone by. Be quit of such supreme folly. There will always be difficulty, the river will always flow. O man, be wise, plunge into it and swim across. Now is the accepted time, and now is the day of salvation. Oh that you would believe in Jesus Christ! May His Spirit lead you to do so now.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon, “The Two ‘Comes,'” The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit, volume 23

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  1. […] everything that Paul wrote.” Such a statement is pure foolishness. The famous British preacher, Charles Spurgeon, responded to such a statement with this […]

  2. […] sovereignty and the concept of human accountability. Both are taught clearly in Scripture. When Charles Spurgeon was asked how he reconciled the two, seemingly contradictory, ideas, he said that he never tried to […]


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