Consolation / Castastrophe

May 30, 2014 at 10:29 am | Posted in Two Sides to Every Comfort | 7 Comments
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The Bible has much to say about comfort, and comfort is something we all need, for none of us are above things like fear, depression, anxiety – even hopelessness. One of the many names that the Bible gives us for our God is “the God of all comfort.”

Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the will of God, and Timothy [our] brother, unto the church of God which is at Corinth, with all the saints which are in all Achaia: Grace [be] to you and peace from God our Father, and [from] the Lord Jesus Christ. Blessed [be] God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort;

II Corinthians 1:1-3

“Comfort” is a word that comes from combining two other words. “Com” simply means “with” and “fort” means “strength.” For example, a military “fort” is supposed to be a position of safety and strength. Some types of foods are described as being “fortified,” which means they are strengthened with vitamins or minerals. We say someone who is courageous has “intestinal fortitude,” which colloquially means that he has “strong guts” (gross). So when the Bible says that God is the God of all comfort it is reminding us that the strength that we need – our “fortification” – will always come from God… which is, of course, a “comforting” thought. But it is also an often misunderstood thought.

Here is how it is misunderstood. We become frightened or confused or stressed out or panicked, and we want comfort. We remember that God is the God of all comfort, and we expect Him to show us comfort or to give comfort or to bring comfort in certain ways, but those ways do not at first always make us “feel” comforted. Therefore, we lose sight of God’s promises, and we begin to doubt God.

Look at what the next part of the passage from II Corinthians says:

Who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God. For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also aboundeth by Christ.

II Corinthians 1:4-5

Words like “tribulation” and “trouble” and “suffering” don’t sound very comforting, but the Bible is reminding us that every comfort that comes from the God of all comfort has two sides to it. You may have heard the expression “two sides to every coin.” Bill Parcells, when he was Head Coach for the Dallas Cowboys, used to like to remind the media that “there is another side to that pancake,” expressing a similar sentiment. In this series of lessons I want to look at some of the specific “comforts” that God gives to us, and turn them over, and look at the flip side.

Consolation

And whether we be afflicted, [it is] for your consolation and salvation, which is effectual in the enduring of the same sufferings which we also suffer: or whether we be comforted, [it is] for your consolation and salvation. And our hope of you [is] stedfast, knowing, that as ye are partakers of the sufferings, so [shall ye be] also of the consolation.

II Corinthians 1:6-7

Consolation is a great gift from the God of all comfort, but we tend think of consolation as kind of the “loser’s prize.” A “consolation game” is where two competitors who have already lost and been eliminated from a tournament play each other without any real consequences riding on the outcome. Consolation is not like that with God. God’s consolation comes with real relief, real rescue, and real redemption.

However, there is a flip side to consolation:

Catastrophe

In order to experience true consolation, you have to first experience some kind of catastrophe – some kind of trouble that you can not get yourself out of in your own strength. We talk about “tragedy” and “accidents” and “mistakes,” forgetting that God is sovereign and that He ordains the catastrophe so that He may grant the consolation. Who would think of a catastrophe as bringing comfort? But be honest: When have you drawn closer to God than ever before in your life? In the good times or the bad times? And how are you going to share the consolation with which God has comforted you, unless you have been through the same catastrophe that someone else is going through? When catastrophe strikes, draw near to God, depend upon Him, and wait for Him to turn the page from catastrophe to consolation.

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  1. […] of resting in Christ, and it is not – as some might imagine – antithetical to rest. It is the other side of the same pancake along with rest. In Psalm 38 we can see an extreme example. David was a man who went after God with […]

  2. […] the first lesson in this series I explained the original meaning of the word comfort: “with strength.” Strength is […]

  3. […] C.onsolation / C.atastrophe O.pportunity / O.bstacles M.ercy / M.emory F.ellowship / F.aults O.versight / O.bedience R.est / R.epentance T.eaching / T.emptation […]

  4. […] week, to serve, to love people you don’t feel like loving. You will need to learn to expect suffering, and to recognize it as an an opportunity to glorify […]

  5. […] trust in the Lord, believing that his “times” were in God’s hand. (Psalm 31:15) Understanding that God is in complete control of all circumstances is a great source of comfort, and a great encouragement to draw near to Him. What enemy can intimidate us when we are in His […]

  6. […] Learning God’s “statutes” (principles and precepts) will assist us in teaching them to find comfort in Him. They are just as important as a rod of correction in discipline, and more so in times of […]

  7. […] their extremity, is evidence by the fact that He was still given grace to pray, and that he had the consolation of knowing that the Master of the Universe was […]


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