The Mountain No One Can Climb Alone

January 14, 2015 at 12:55 pm | Posted in Matthew, Salvation | 8 Comments
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Matthew Chapter 5 contains the first part of the “Sermon on the Mount,” and includes the “Beatitudes.”  Since we know that Matthew stresses Christ Jesus in His role as King, we may read this sermon as the King’s creed – the guiding and foundational principles of His Kingdom.

Since we also know that the book of Matthew was written primarily to the Jewish people, we may now unlock the significance of Matthew Chapter 5, Verse 1:  “And seeing the multitudes, he went up into a mountain: and when he was set, his disciples came unto him:”  The Holy Spirit inspired Matthew to make a point of saying that Jesus “went up into a mountain” in order to call to mind the differences between the law that Christ the King was about to pronounce, and the law that Moses gave on Mount Sinai.

And, like everything in the Old Testament which is a shadow (Hebrews 10:1) or a type of the New Covenant, the law of Christ is “more perfect” than the law of Moses (Hebrews 8:5-7).  Examples:  Moses said, give God a tithe (one tenth); Christ says, surrender everything you have to God; Moses said, do not kill; Christ says, do not even hate your enemies; Moses said, do not commit adultery; Christ says, do not even look at a woman with lust in your heart; Moses said, give God a day (the Sabbath); Christ says, give God every moment of every day of your life.

It quickly becomes clear in Matthew Chapter 5 that the kind of rule-keeping and regulation-following it would take to truly achieve “righteousness” under God’s law is impossible for man to obtain.  Only Christ’s righteousness is sufficient for the Kingdom of Heaven.  Has that righteousness been imputed to you by faith?  If not, trust and obey Jesus Christ the King right now. (Romans 4:22-25)

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  1. […] Sermon on the Mount contains the Beatitudes. It is deeply theological, but the deeper you go, the more practical it […]

  2. […] getting into the presence of God the Father. We don’t climb a mountain to do it – we do it in Christ – but it is a still a real thing, and it can transform your […]

  3. […] Chapter 13 we have seen the King’s arrival announced, His background confirmed, His Kingdom described and explained, and His power […]

  4. […] we have seen the King’s genealogy, and historical proof of His kingship. We have also looked at the principles of His Kingdom, and have seen the King and His followers begin to put those principles into practice, and to […]

  5. […] the beginning of Matthew Chapter 16 the King had revealed secrets about His Kingdom, and now He was ready to reveal secrets about His […]

  6. […] fulfilled in Christ (Colossians 2:16- 22). Only the Old Testament moral laws, reiterated as the Law of Christ, are considered binding under the New […]

  7. […] of Fulfilled Righteousness (Matthew 3:13-15) 6. The Relief of being Blessed (Matthew 4) 7. The Mountain No One Can Climb Alone (Matthew 5) 8. Beware the Foreign Figurehead (Matthew 5:5) 9. Objections To the Doctrine of […]

  8. […] When we compare the different viewpoint of the four “Gospels” we see that Matthew shows Jesus as King, and that the Holy Spirit had him write with a Jewish audience primarily in mind. Luke highlights the humanity of Jesus, and is addressed mainly to a Greek audience. John has a broader, more universal audience in mind, and emphasizes Jesus as the Son of God. The Book of Mark (second book of the New Testament) places an emphasis on Jesus’s role as a servant, and seems to be addressed primarily to gentiles in general, and Romans in particular. When we read Mark, Jesus seems to be almost always in motion – on the move. Unlike Matthew and Luke, Mark does not contain the Lord’s earthly genealogy. Nor does it rehearse the Sermon on the Mount. […]


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