From Investing to Interceding

March 30, 2020 at 1:48 pm | Posted in Luke | 1 Comment
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And as they heard these things, he added and spake a parable, because he was nigh to Jerusalem, and because they thought that the kingdom of God should immediately appear.

Luke 19:11

People were expecting a political and military revolution, but instead Jesus taught a parable. It is a parable about a nobleman or a king who had to leave his kingdom for a while, but is going to come back.

And he called his ten servants, and delivered them ten pounds, and said unto them, Occupy till I come.

Luke 19:13

He leaves some of his funds with these servants and tells them to “occupy” – to put the funds to use – to get busy investing or using the funds to advance the kingdom to show their loyalty or faithfulness. “Pounds” is translated from the Greek word mna, which was about three months’ wages or the rough equivalent of $5000 today. When the nobleman gets back, he asks three of them for an accounting.

Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds.

Luke 19:16

That’s a pretty good return, like investing $5000 and receiving another $150,000 in return!

And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities.

Luke 19:7

The nobleman tells him he has done a good job, and that his reward is… more work! But it’s honorable work.

And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained five pounds.

Luke 19:18

This is not as much, but still really good.

And he said likewise to him, Be thou also over five cities. And another came, saying, Lord, behold, here is thy pound, which I have kept laid up in a napkin:

Luke 19:19-20

I’m no investment expert, but I’m thinking “hide the money in the napkin” is not the wisest investment plan – and certainly not the most proactive. Here’s his excuse:

For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man: thou takest up that thou layedst not down, and reapest that thou didst not sow. And he saith unto him, Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant. Thou knewest that I was an austere man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that I did not sow:

Luke 19:21-22

The nobleman basically tells him that he’s dug his own hole. The servant knew “about” his master, but he didn’t “know” his master. We need to be aggressively investing our lives, our talents, our funds, and especially the Gospel, because our Master is kind, but He is also going to demand an accounting.

And they brought him to Jesus: and they cast their garments upon the colt, and they set Jesus thereon.

Luke 19:35

In the record of Jesus’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem we see four attitudes about Him:

1. The Roman soldiers saw Jesus as innocuous.

This parade would have looked pretty silly to them. Do you have trouble taking Jesus seriously? You shouldn’t. He is eternally serious and significant.

2. The Jewish people saw Jesus as insurrectionary.

And when he was come nigh, even now at the descent of the mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen; Saying, Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord: peace in heaven, and glory in the highest.

Luke 19:37-38

They wanted to see salvation in a visible way, and to see it right at that moment. They sang a Psalm of deliverance. They hoped Jesus would deliver them from Roman rule and re-establish the kingdom of Israel on earth the way King David had done. Do you see Jesus as only the answer to your financial or health or or marriage or parenting problems? I hope not. He is much more than that.

3. The religious leaders saw Him as inconvenient.

And some of the Pharisees from among the multitude said unto him, Master, rebuke thy disciples. And he answered and said unto them, I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out.

Luke 19:39-40

He was a threat to their religious profiteering. Do you see Jesus as inconvenient, as though He is in the way of your “fun” or your career or your social climbing? I hope not. Jesus is more important than all of those things combined.

4. Jesus saw Himself as intervening and interceding.

And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it, Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace! but now they are hid from thine eyes.

Luke 19:41-42

Jesus loved the people He came to live and die for, and He loves you today. Jesus got involved and He prayed and He did something about the problem. We must do these things also. The love of Jesus is real love.

The Gospel of Luke emphasizes Jesus’s humanity: He is shown joking, crying, compassionate, concerned, and even angry:

And he went into the temple, and began to cast out them that sold therein, and them that bought; Saying unto them, It is written, My house is the house of prayer: but ye have made it a den of thieves.

Luke 19:45-46

Matthew 21 and Mark 11 talk about Him turning over tables and casting out the religious profiteers who were desecrating the Court of the Gentiles. Jesus was not a faker. We should not be either. Be passionate rather than fake.

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  1. […] 33. Persistent Pleas, Powerful Prayers, a Proud Pharisee, and a Penitent Publican (Luke 18:1-14) 34. From Investing to Interceding (Luke […]


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