Glory, Glory, What’s It to You?

December 10, 2018 at 11:58 am | Posted in I Peter | Leave a comment
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The word “glory” is found 12 times in the book of I Peter. We tend to think of glory as a state of exaltation or celebration, as though this world’s version of glory, often seen in connection with fame, wealth, luxury, and ease, was its truest representation. However, when Christian believers think of the glory of God reflected in our lives, we must remember that, in the Bible, real glory is often connected to suffering, trials, tribulation, and reproach. This is because such difficulties culminate in eternal, not temporal, glory for those who are called by God’s grace in Christ Jesus.

Here are links to the posts in the category I Peter:

1. The Hope of Glory (I Peter 1)
2. Eternal Security Does Not Have an Expiration Date (I Peter 1:5)
3. Holy (I Peter 1:15)
4. Practical Holiness (I Peter 1:13-17)
5. Growing and Living Stones (I Peter 2)
6. Battling for Glory (I Peter 1-2)
7. Submission and Sin (I Peter 2:13)
8. The Degrees of Estimation (I Peter 2:17)
9. God’s Specific Will for You (I Peter 2:13-14; 3:17; 5:10)
10. Submission and Honor in Marriage (I Peter 3:1-7)
11. A Not-So-Amazing Marriage (I Peter 3:1-7)
12. Inhabiting and Investigating Your Marriage (I Peter 3:1-7)
13. Influence, Intercession, and Inheritance in Marriage (I Peter 2:25-3:7) *
14. How to Fight Evil (I Peter 3:8-16)
15. The Just Suffering for the Unjust (I Peter 3:17-21)
16. The Most Obvious Difference between Jesus and Us (I Peter 3:18)
17. Suffering, Sin, and Sobriety (I Peter 4:1-7)
18. Sobering Up, Sobering Down, Sobering All Around (I Peter 4:7-11)
19. Suffering for Glory (I Peter 4:11-5:1)
20. Oversight / Obedience (I Peter 5:1-6)
21. Beware of Fresh-Faced Frowardness (I Peter 5:5)
22. Overseeing the Sheep (I Peter 5:8-9)

* most-viewed post in category

Overseeing the Sheep

December 7, 2018 at 1:27 pm | Posted in I Peter | 2 Comments
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In the last part of I Peter Chapter 4, and into Chapter 5, we move from preparing for glory through “regular” persecution and suffering to preparing for glory through “official” persecution – intense suffering. When the intense suffering comes, it will be important to have properly prepared overseers (church leaders who recognize that they are under the authority of the true Shepherd and in authority over the sheep). This applies to the heads of families (fathers and husbands primarily) as well as church leaders.

1. The overseers will need to be personally involved with the Shepherd, and willing to share what He’s given them.

2. They will need to have a deep and abiding love for the sheep.

3. But they will have to have a desire to please the Shepherd, not the sheep.

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour: Whom resist stedfast in the faith, knowing that the same afflictions are accomplished in your brethren that are in the world.

I Peter 5:8-9

Resist Satan with Scripture. Don’t discuss things with him.

Suffering for Glory

November 21, 2018 at 2:19 pm | Posted in I Peter | 2 Comments
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If any man speak, let him speak as the oracles of God; if any man minister, let him do it as of the ability which God giveth: that God in all things may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom be praise and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

I Peter 4:11 (emphasis added)

The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children of God: And if children, then heirs; heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ; if so be that we suffer with him, that we may be also glorified together. For I reckon that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.

Romans 8:16-18

Would a lifetime of what we call “suffering” be worth it to see God’s glory? It’s not even close! Just a GLIMPSE would far outweigh all suffering.

Have ye suffered so many things in vain? if it be yet in vain.

Galatians 3:4

It is not vain to suffer for the Gospel. It is not vain to suffer for God’s glory.

But rejoice, inasmuch as ye are partakers of Christ’s sufferings; that, when his glory shall be revealed, ye may be glad also with exceeding joy.

I Peter 4:13

The elders which are among you I exhort, who am also an elder, and a witness of the sufferings of Christ, and also a partaker of the glory that shall be revealed:

I Peter 5:1

God is not so much in the replacement business as He is in the transformation business. We don’t get our suffering replaced with glory; our suffering is transformed into glory.

A bruised reed shall he not break, and smoking flax shall he not quench, till he send forth judgment unto victory.

Matthew 12:20

Christ can take the things that seem too broken to be useful, too painful to be joyous, too unpleasant to be productive, and and He can transform them into things too wonderful to be ignored. The discomfort of pregnancy, and the excruciating agony of labor and delivery are transformed into joy at the sight of a newborn baby.

Satan hates for God to be glorified in this world, and he hates the name of Christ. I don’t know that he hates the name of Baptist or Methodist or Presbyterian or any denomination, but if you tell somebody, “Jesus loves you. He wants you to repent of your sin, and He wants to save you,” that’s when Satan will cause somebody get offended.

Yet if any man suffer as a Christian, let him not be ashamed; but let him glorify God on this behalf.

I Peter 4:16 (emphasis added)

This is one of only three times the Word “Christian” is used in the Bible (Acts 11:26 and Acts 26:28 being the other two). The idea is that a Christian is a “little Christ” or someone “of the party of Christ.” It was first devised by pagans as a derogatory term, although true Christians would find it extremely complimentary. Over time the Devil has tried to dilute the meaning so that people think it means “somebody who goes to church” or “somebody who has a personal belief in a higher power” or “somebody with conservative political views” or “somebody who doesn’t curse or get drunk or behave promiscuously.”

There is a fiery trial coming. The trials today, for the most part, for Christians living in the comfort of 21st Century America, are just a little toasty – not raging infernos like what is coming. One day the fire will separate folks, and we’ll find out just how much people VALUE the name “Christian.” The thought of eternal fire might get folks a little motivated to “do right,” but even vipers flea from a fire (Acts 28:3).

For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it first begin at us, what shall the end be of them that obey not the gospel of God? And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear?

I Peter 4:17-18

Fiery trials bring heat, but also light. They are good places for self-examination, and for asking, “What is causing my suffering?” Suffering for Christ is cause for rejoicing because it brings glory to God.

Sobering Up, Sobering Down, Sobering All Around

October 31, 2018 at 2:18 pm | Posted in I Peter | 1 Comment
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As Christians our attitude as we are being prepared for glory (especially in suffering) should be an attitude of expectancy. But how do we maintain this attitude? We can’t just go around looking up at the sky, hoping that Jesus will come back any second, and ignoring everything around us. We can’t be lazy, but we can’t be overly fanatical either (although, for those of us who have seen much apathy on the part of those who ought to be serving Christ zealously, it would seem something of a relief to have to cool down a hot-headed fanatic rather than trying to warm up a bunch of corpses).

But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.

I Peter 4:7 (emphasis added)

“Be ye therefore sober” in that verse means to keep your mind steady and clear – to “stay cool,” to “chill out.” The opposite of “sober-minded” is “mania” or “frenzy.” At least 12 times in the Bible, the exhortation or option is given to be “sober” (II Corinthians 5:13; I Thessalonians 5:6,8; I Timothy 3:2, 11; Titus 1:8, 2:2,4,6; I Peter 1:13, 4:7, 5:8).

Revelation Chapter 12 is a great chapter to study and apply, but do not base your entire Christian life on Revelation Chapter 12. Some people are so excited about proving their interpretation of end-times prophecy that it’s like they think they’re on the planning committee. We need to move from the planning committee to the welcoming committee. When is Christ coming back? When He’s good and ready (and He’s already good).

But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.

I Peter 4:7 (emphasis added)

And he cometh, and findeth them sleeping, and saith unto Peter, Simon, sleepest thou? couldest not thou watch one hour? Watch ye and pray, lest ye enter into temptation. The spirit truly is ready, but the flesh is weak. And again he went away, and prayed, and spake the same words. And when he returned, he found them asleep again, (for their eyes were heavy,) neither wist they what to answer him.

Mark 14:37-40

This may give us some insight into why the Holy Ghost used Peter to write I Peter 4:7. Like all of us, at one time he needed to learn the importance of being sober and praying.

And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves: for charity shall cover the multitude of sins.

I Peter 4:8

Hatred stirreth up strifes: but love covereth all sins.

Proverbs 10:12

Love covers sins, the way that Japheth and Shem covered Noah’s sin, although Ham wanted to turn it into a spectacle.

Use hospitality one to another without grudging.

I Peter 4:9

It is important for Christians to share the homes that God allows them to manage.

As every man hath received the gift, even so minister the same one to another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God.

I Peter 4:10

Identify and use your spiritual gift(s), or, more practically, USE and identify your spiritual gift(s).

If any man speak, let him speak as the oracles of God; if any man minister, let him do it as of the ability which God giveth: that God in all things may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom be praise and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

I Peter 4:11

Suffering, Sin, and Sobriety

October 19, 2018 at 3:15 pm | Posted in I Peter | 4 Comments
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Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;

I Peter 4:1

Christ did not cease from His own sin, because He had no sin, but the principle that suffering in the flesh can bring about a cessation from sin helps us prepare for not giving in to sin when suffering comes, and it prepares us to arm ourselves against the temptation to sin that often accompanies suffering.

Suffering is not always caused by a specific sin in a direct one-to-one relationship, but, even when we see suffering as the result of sin, the Devil still often manages to trick us by using our suffering as a temptation TO sin. We need to recall Christ’s resistance against temptation when He suffered for sin that wasn’t even His own.

That he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh to the lusts of men, but to the will of God.

I Peter 4:2

The will of God is perfect. Therefore, it should bring contentment, if not outright enjoyment or ecstatic pleasure. However, we’re often so anxious to get more without giving up what we already have. What would make me think God would entrust me with more spiritual blessings if I haven’t even obeyed Him in my use of the ones He’s already entrusted to me? If God has commanded me to do something, it OUGHT to be done, and if it OUGHT to be done, it CAN be done, through the power and grace of God.

For the time past of our life may suffice us to have wrought the will of the Gentiles, when we walked in lasciviousness, lusts, excess of wine, revellings, banquetings, and abominable idolatries:

I Peter 4:3

When we look back at our pre-conversion days, we must not make the excuse of “just” being trapped in sin. We were not Christians on the inside, just waiting for Christ to cut the strings on the package so we could burst free. No, let’s be honest. We enjoyed sin. We wanted sin more than we wanted holiness, and, in some cases, even salvation. Now, don’t let the Devil beat you up over this and give you a false reason to be defeated. We were slaves to sin, but we weren’t totally miserable in every sense, or we wouldn’t have been so good at it. When we remember this, we won’t get so exasperated with people who meet our attempts to share the Gospel with a reply of, “Come on, join the party.”

Wherein they think it strange that ye run not with them to the same excess of riot, speaking evil of you:

I Peter 4:4

Light is strong, but light is not always popular. A child lost in the woods, cold, scared, and hungry, rejoices to see a light and runs to it. But the barroom crowd hates the light, and they’ll likely throw a beer bottle at you for shining it in their face.

Who shall give account to him that is ready to judge the quick and the dead.

I Peter 4:5

Lost people are heading toward a judgment date with the most terrible Judge of all; they don’t need us to judge them.

For for this cause was the gospel preached also to them that are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit.

I Peter 4:6

That’s not talking about folks who are physically dead. If they died without receiving Christ, we can’t pray enough, pay enough, or light enough candles to bring them to eternal life. It’s talking about the spiritually dead judging the living – people lost in sin causing suffering for living saints now, and not even being able to see that they will one day be judged themselves. This type of suffering, though, conforms us to the image of Christ, teaching us to be longsuffering, patient, slow to anger.

But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.

I Peter 4:7

If you are a Christian experiencing suffering, financial problems, or the temptation to sin right now, and it is causing you, in panic, to turn to whichever religious charlatan is offering you a quick-fix scheme, chill out. You don’t have to run around your house “pleading the blood,” doing incantations and spells around every window sill and door frame to ward off the attack of the Devil. Be sober. Gird up the loins of your mind. Get your eyes fixed on God’s glory. Stay right on the line of the Word and His will. Watch and pray. Be vigilant and militant and harsh about sin in your life. The Devil can’t beat you up unless you fall asleep on your watch.

The Just Suffering for the Unjust

September 26, 2018 at 9:45 am | Posted in I Peter | 4 Comments
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For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

I Peter 3:18

The “Spirit” here is capitalized in the King James Version, and several other, though not all, translations. The capitalization leads the reader to believe that the Spirit being referenced is the Holy Spirit, the third Person of the Trinity, but could Christ have had a “spirit” other than the Holy Spirit? Matthew 26:41, Romans 1:3-4, Luke 23:46, and James 2:26 wold seem to indicate that Jesus, in His full humanity, did have a spirit, although I still believe that I Peter 3:18 is talking about the Holy Spirit.

The term “quickened” means “made alive,” although “resurrection” normally refers to a physical body.

By which also he went and preached unto the spirits in prison;

I Peter 3:19

There has been much conjecture and dispute over the identity of these “spirits in prison.” I do not believe that they are lost sinners in hell. “Spirits” might mean some type of beings, but “souls” would be the way to refer to human beings.

Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water.

I Peter 3:20

“Preached” in 3:19 is thought to be “proclamation” rather than “convincing” or “exhorting” as in “preaching the Gospel,” so it is possible that the spirits are fallen angels, perhaps the demons who influenced the “sons of God” into mating with the “daughters of men” in Genesis 6. Christ would not have “preached” salvation to lost sinners or to fallen angels, and the Bible does not say that Christ went to the place of everlasting torment we call hell, although many people mistakenly derive that idea from:

He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see corruption.

Acts 2:31

This verse is actually quoting David in Psalm 16:10, speaking of sheol, the realm of the dead.

Some commentators believe that Christ went to preach to the Old Testament saints in the afterlife (“Abraham’s Bosom”) between His death on the Cross and His Resurrection, but this is not likely. Most Scripture supports absence from the body as being present with the Lord for believers.

Unbelievers are separated from God after death, and their damnation is finally determined at that point, although they have not yet been finally judged and cast into the lake of fire.

To understand I Peter 3:20 it is crucial to look at the context.

For it is better, if the will of God be so, that ye suffer for well doing, than for evil doing. For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:

I Peter 3:17-18

The theme is “suffering.”

Thou hast ascended on high, thou hast led captivity captive: thou hast received gifts for men; yea, for the rebellious also, that the LORD God might dwell among them.

Psalm 68:18

This verse is quoted in the New Testament also:

Wherefore he saith, When he ascended up on high, he led captivity captive, and gave gifts unto men.

Ephesians 4:8

Christ made a public display of defeating Satan – a “triumph” is what the people in ancient Rome would have called it – but this public display is what we call the Crucifixion and the Ascension. It is not something that occurred during the the time when Jesus was in the grave – or wherever His Spirit was before His body was resurrected. I Peter 3:19 does say He went and preached unto the spirits in prison, but I think that is talking about His Spirit preaching through the obedience of Noah in the days of Noah. That is why Noah is brought up next.

Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water.

I Peter 3:20

Elsewhere, the Holy Spirit had Peter call Noah a preacher of righteousness.

For if God spared not the angels that sinned, but cast them down to hell, and delivered them into chains of darkness, to be reserved unto judgment; And spared not the old world, but saved Noah the eighth person, a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood upon the world of the ungodly;

II Peter 2:4-5

The Holy Spirit – Christ’s Spirit – preached through the actions of Noah, preaching condemnation, but also righteousness, through Noah’s obedience.

Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water. The like figure whereunto even baptism doth also now save us (not the putting away of the filth of the flesh, but the answer of a good conscience toward God,) by the resurrection of Jesus Christ:

I Peter 3:20-21

The same waters that condemned the world saved Noah, which is pictured in New Testament baptism. The same grave that tried to condemn Christ – and made it look like a victory for Satan – turned around and brought about Christ’s ultimate victory, as He used it to “preach” (“proclaim”) His authority and power over EVERYTHING having to do with sin: death, hell, the grave, principalities, powers, this world’s authorities, flesh, fallen angels, Satan.

Remember, we’re talking about suffering: the just suffering for the unjust. Christ could have beaten all His enemies without suffering, but He wanted to save the unjust: you and me.

How to Fight Evil

September 11, 2018 at 12:39 pm | Posted in I Peter | 2 Comments
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As Christians, we are being prepared for glory. We should be prepared for being prepared. Look for opportunities to show God’s glory, and then you will see coming trials as opportunities instead of obstacles.

Not rendering evil for evil, or railing for railing: but contrariwise blessing; knowing that ye are thereunto called, that ye should inherit a blessing.

I Peter 3:8

In order to prepare for trials we must begin to sow the seeds of love among each other. Normally, we speak of the principles of the harvest in relation to reaching the lost, but love among the brethren (including the “sistren!”) is also something we must “cultivate.” If we can’t love our friends and family, we will never be able to love our enemies.

There are three levels to fighting that involves evil:
1. Fighting good with evil is the Satanic level.
2. Fighting evil with evil (or returning good for good) is the earthly – or fleshly – level. Sadly, most Christians hover at this level.
3. Fighting evil with good is the Godly level – the Christ-like level.

For he that will love life, and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips that they speak no guile: Let him eschew evil, and do good; let him seek peace, and ensue it. For the eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, and his ears are open unto their prayers: but the face of the Lord is against them that do evil.

I Peter 3:10-12

This level will require vigilance in four areas:

1. We must control our tongues. Don’t be like many preachers who are quick to condemn Peter as a hot-head, and an example of someone who was always writing checks with his mouth that his actual conduct couldn’t cash, for we are often just as bad, and many times much worse.

2. We must have a hatred of sin. As we cultivate the garden of love, we must aggressively pull out weeds.

3. We must go out of our way to pursue peace – to be a thermostat, not just a thermometer.

But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts: and be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you with meekness and fear:

I Peter 3:15

4. We must sanctify Christ as our Lord. The fear of Him keeps us from being afraid of anything else. I should be afraid to rebel against Him. I should not be afraid to commit my life to Him. His will is perfect (Romans 12:2).

We must be prepared to give an answer, but we are witnesses, not prosecutors.

Having a good conscience; that, whereas they speak evil of you, as of evildoers, they may be ashamed that falsely accuse your good conversation in Christ.

I Peter 3:16

We must constantly maintain (perform maintenance on) our conscience. Con means “with” and “science” means “knowledge.” Our conscience is what we “know with.” It is like a mirror. It should show the truth, but it only works when there’s light. If a mirror gets dirty, it gets distorted. It can make us think we’re okay, that we look fine, when we are not okay, or when we’re actually filthy. If it keeps getting dirty, eventually it gets blackened. It shuts out all light, and we are left thinking good is evil, and evil is good.

Lord, I pray that the light of Your Truth would shine brightly into our lives – even if it is painful at first. Help us to love the light and reflect the light. Help us to be glory reflectors, shining Your light on a dark, dark world. Please bless those who gather to obey You, and those who have applied themselves to the study of Your Word to show themselves approved. Help us to be unashamed workers. In the name of Jesus I pray. Amen.

Submission and Honor in Marriage

August 27, 2018 at 10:46 am | Posted in I Peter | 2 Comments
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Likewise, ye wives, be in subjection to your own husbands; that, if any obey not the word, they also may without the word be won by the conversation of the wives;

I Peter 3:1

There are the levels of rank in the army of the Lord. A wife who will not come into subjection and submission to the will of her husband, or a child who will not come under subjection and submission to the will of a parent, will have a very difficult time submitting to the will of the Lord.

Likewise, ye husbands, dwell with them according to knowledge, giving honour unto the wife, as unto the weaker vessel, and as being heirs together of the grace of life; that your prayers be not hindered.

I Peter 3:7

Husbands and wives are joint heirs of gracejoined together by God for His glory. The wife who will not submit, and the husband who will not honor, both rob God of His glory. An earthly father who is zealous for his daughter’s well-being will certainly deal harshly with a son-in-law who mistreats that daughter. How much more will the Lord deal harshly with a husband who mistreats a daughter of God? Husbands will answer to God for how they have treated His daughters, probably even before they answer for have they have handled their church-related ministry responsibilities.

The “likewises” in v. 1 and v. 7 refer not just to Abraham and Sara, but to the Lord Jesus Christ. Our spouses are not just given to us by God for our pleasure, nor merely for companionship and comfort.

Wives, submit yourselves unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord.

Ephesians 5:22

Husbands, love your wives, even as Christ also loved the church, and gave himself for it;

Ephesians 5:25

God has joined spouses together as part of His plan to conform us to the image of Christ. Christ loved – and gave Himself for – people who were originally unresponsive to, or actually opposed to, His love. If we hope to be conformed to the likeness of Christ, we must learn to submit to, to honor, to obey, to love in spite of unresponsiveness or opposition, to love unconditionally and CONSISTENTLY our spouses.

Submission and Sin

August 20, 2018 at 4:03 pm | Posted in I Peter | 1 Comment
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Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord’s sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme;

I Peter 2:13

Christians are supposed to submit to the institutions on this earth which were ordained by God. These include the family, the government, and the Church. The world says submission is slavery. The hairs on the back of our necks bristle at the very thought of submission, but the attitude and practice of submission is one of the most overlooked virtues of the Christian life today. Most large churches and most of the major religions and denominations today are teaching that we should be allowed to pick and choose when and when not to submit. There is very little true submission to the ordinances of man, to Godly authority in our homes, to church discipline, and, least of all, to the Bible and God Himself.

These failures come from a deceptive and foolish attitude about sin. We are taught today that sin is something that hurts someone else. If I take something that belongs to someone else, it is stealing, and we recognize stealing as “bad” because I have deprived someone else of something that he needed. But what’s really bad is that I broke Commandment No. 8. I broke my God’s COMMANDthat’s sin. Bill Gates probably made more money while I was writing this lesson than I could make in 10 lifetimes. If I had access to his personal possessions, I could probably take a Rolls Royce or a Rolex watch and it wouldn’t hurt him a bit. But it would be a SIN – an offense against my Lord and Savior that He bore in His body on the tree.

At the end of I Peter Chapter 2 we see some of the paradoxes of Christ. He was given stripes so we could be healed. We die so we can live (die to sins, and live unto righteousness). He was the Shepherd Who died for the sheep SO He could oversee the sheep for all eternity. He knew no sin, but He bare the sin in His own body on the tree – the sign of a cursed life – when His whole life was nothing but one giant blessing to God the Father, and to all mankind. He bore MY sin on that tree, and it wasn’t just sins against others. It was and is sin against HIM.

In light of that, as citizens, we are called to submit to the laws of government and to the men who hold offices in government. As church members, we are called to submit to church leaders. As employees, we are called to submit to employers. Wives are to submit to husbands. Children are to submit to parents.

Battling for Glory

July 2, 2018 at 3:13 pm | Posted in I Peter | 5 Comments
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As Christians, our journey on the road to glory begins with our spiritual birth. As we move from glory to glory with our minds “hinged” (not unhinged), and with our eyes fixed on Jesus, Who is both the Author and the Finisher of our journey, we remember that we are sojourners and pilgrims, not homeless wanderers. All through this journey, we are being prepared for glory as we go, and we are moving toward the fullness of glory, even as we make conquests along the way. We are bringing our thoughts into captivity and getting victories over our enemies, but how well the devil knows this tendency of ours to think of the victories as “ours!”

Here is where we have to be in the Word and filled with the Spirit. A victory along the way is not winning the whole war.

Dearly beloved, I beseech you as strangers and pilgrims, abstain from fleshly lusts, which war against the soul;

I Peter 2:11

The war is the whole campaign, not an individual battle.

And Jesus answered and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven. and I say also unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it.

Matthew 16:17-18

Peter would be very displeased with the idea (proffered by many people) that he is the rock upon which the church is built, and the false idea that his successors get revelations from God not found in His Holy Word.

For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ.

I Corinthians 3:11

Flesh and blood don’t reveal to us that Jesus is the Son of God. We become children of God by grace through faith. Likewise, we don’t fight spiritual battles by flesh and blood. We fight by submitting to God’s Spirit, and we do this by faith.

For though we walk in the flesh, we do not war after the flesh:

II Corinthians 10:3

This is a paradox. We win battles by surrendering. We do fight battles, but we don’t win these battles by fighting them in the worldly way. Beware of the temptation of Satan. Victory in battle can easily give place to lawlessness, but an attitude of submission does not allow for lawlessness or rebellion.

Having your conversation honest among the Gentiles: that, whereas they speak against you as evildoers, they may by your good works, which they shall behold, glorify God in the day of visitation.

I Peter 2:12

Our submission to God will be a witness to unbelievers.

Wherefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ;

I Peter 1:13

But as he which hath called you is holy, so be ye holy in all manner of conversation;

I Peter 1:15

Having a good testimony in the presence of unbelievers is not the way to bring ourselves glory. It is a way to bring glory to God, and to present a favorable impression of Him in the eyes of the lost for the “day of visitation.”

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