Who Is Leviathan and What Is He Twisting?

June 8, 2017 at 10:31 am | Posted in Q&A | Leave a comment
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Question: Is there an evil spirit named Leviathan who “twists” communications between Christians in order to cause division and trouble in the Church?

Answer: Leviathan, in the Bible, was some sort of giant sea serpent. Some commentators believe it may have been a reference to huge crocodiles which grew to greater sizes in the ancient world than they do today. It is used as an example of God’s awesome creation and His power over it. However, a few years ago a preacher named Ron Phillips published a book on “spiritual warfare” in which he attempted to give names to some of the demons (formerly angels which fell from Heaven when Lucifer rebelled against God). He decided to call one of them “Leviathan” even though “Leviathan” is never used in the Bible as the name of a demon or a demonic spirit. This sort of teaching is fanciful at best and outright heretical at worst, but it became extremely popular among many Charismatic and Pentecostal preachers. The idea, I suppose, is that, since “Leviathan” is like a serpent or a crocodile which “twists” its prey in a death roll after it strikes, then the “Leviathan spirit” must be a demon which “twists” the communications of human beings to cause conflict and disunity and miscommunication. Certainly, we can not put it past Satan to attempt to cause trouble in the lives of believers in whatever ways he can, but we need to stick to what the Bible actually says, rather than naming and blaming supernatural beings when we ourselves fail to heed the Word of God.

The First Interpreter

November 30, 2010 at 9:58 am | Posted in Genesis | 9 Comments
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In Genesis’s account of the adventures of Joseph, we see yet another Biblical “first.” In Genesis Chapter 40, Joseph, the “dream expert” (Genesis 37:19) is in prison. The Pharaoh’s chief butler and chief baker happen to be imprisoned with him. They have some very odd dreams, and Joseph, realizing that God can help him, agrees to interpret their dreams. Thereby he becomes the first “interpreter” in the Bible.

An interpreter is a person who translates messages between people among whom there is some barrier to communication.

And they said unto him, We have dreamed a dream, and there is no interpreter of it. And Joseph said unto them, Do not interpretations belong to God? tell me them, I pray you.

Genesis 40:8

Of all the ways that Joseph reminds us of a type of Christ, here is one of the most poignant. For we, like the baker and the butler, were at one time separated from our King, and trapped in a prison of sin. We dreamed of ways to make peace with God. But our sinful condition kept Him from coming into forgiving fellowship with us. Then came a Man who could speak to both parties: King and prisoner; God and man. His name was similar to “Joseph,” but we know Him as Jesus. He was the only One Who could truly interpret our dreams of escaping prison. He brought the Good News from His King to us, and took our responsive message of repentance, and our cries for rescue, back to the King.

The word “interpreter” shows up again in the book of Job. Elihu is attempting to explain to Job the way God sometimes deals with those whose sins are bringing them into an eternal spiritual prison.

Yea, his soul draweth near unto the grave, and his life to the destroyers. If there be a messenger with him, an interpreter, one among a thousand, to shew unto man his uprightness: Then he is gracious unto him, and saith, Deliver him from going down to the pit: I have found a ransom.

Job 33:22-24

What a beautiful picture of Christ the Interpreter! Among all the angels of Heaven, One greater than an angel comes forward, One Who is unlike all the rest (“one among a thousand”). By His grace He imputes righteousness to lost sinners bound for the pit, offering Himself as their ransom.


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