The Laver as Baptistry?

July 17, 2018 at 3:31 pm | Posted in Q&A | 5 Comments
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Question: Does the washing and purification of the priests in the laver of the Old Testament Tabernacle have any significance for the New Testament ordinance of baptism?

Answer: The Tabernacle laver (made of bronze) is first mentioned in Exodus 30:18. The priests were required to use it to wash both their hands and feet every time they went from the courtyard into the Most Holy Place – upon penalty of death. Its primary function was practical: sanitary hygiene. Many of the priests handled raw meat and bloody flesh. Although “germs” weren’t common knowledge in those days, God certainly knew about their relation to disease, and many of His laws protected the people from things like Hepatitis A (which is easily spread by the failure to wash hands when dealing with shared food preparation) without their knowledge. However, the laver also had a symbolic function. Most people know the expression “cleanliness is next to Godliness.” While this expression is not precisely from the Bible, it does express the idea that holiness is associated with purity. The idea that people would approach the presence of the holy God with dirty hands and feet would be offensive as a reminder of how wrong it would be for sinful people to approach a pure and righteous God. When gentiles would convert to Judaism in the Old Testament, they would be baptized as a symbol of washing away their sin and “uncleanliness.” New Testament baptism is different, though. For Christians, our sin was borne and expiated by Jesus on the Cross, and our baptism, which should be subsequent to conversion, symbolizes our identification with Christ in His death (going down into the water), burial (being under the water), and Resurrection (coming up out of the water).

The True Consecration

August 27, 2015 at 11:33 am | Posted in Exodus | 4 Comments
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The consecration ceremony for the Levitical priests lasted seven days.

And thus shalt thou do unto Aaron, and to his sons, according to all things which I have commanded thee: seven days shalt thou consecrate them.

Exodus 29:35

And Aaron shall burn thereon sweet incense every morning: when he dresseth the lamps, he shall burn incense upon it. And when Aaron lighteth the lamps at even, he shall burn incense upon it, a perpetual incense before the Lord throughout your generations. Ye shall offer no strange incense thereon, nor burnt sacrifice, nor meat offering; neither shall ye pour drink offering thereon.

Exodus 30:7-9

The burning of the incense represents prayer, and many Christians have adopted the discipline of dedicated prayer times in the morning and the evening, although we can, and should, certainly pray throughout the day, as we are no longer separated from God by priests or a veil or the external requirement of burning incense. As New Testament Christians we meet with God in prayer – open communication – in Christ our High Priest Who has torn the veil and brought us into the Most Holy Place.

Hebrews Chapter 9 reveals to us that the Tabernacle furnishings and practices were meant to be temporary, and were earthly symbols of the Heavenly reality. Christ accomplished the fulfillment of the temporary types by being a “better:”
-Moses
-Covenant
-Tabernacle
-Priest
-High Priest
-Laver
-Lampstand
-Sacrifice
-Holy Place
-Most Holy Place
-Promise (Under the Old Covenant God visited His people here on earth, but under the New Covenant He also brings us to Himself in Heaven.)
-Destination (No longer merely Canaan, but a place of true spiritual rest where we will experience the peace and joy and fulfillment of what we were really meant to be.)

Speak thou also unto the children of Israel, saying, Verily my sabbaths ye shall keep: for it is a sign between me and you throughout your generations; that ye may know that I am the Lord that doth sanctify you. Ye shall keep the sabbath therefore; for it is holy unto you: every one that defileth it shall surely be put to death: for whosoever doeth any work therein, that soul shall be cut off from among his people.

Exodus 31:13-14

The consecration of the New Covenant is Christ’s Own blood on the real mercy seat, where He applied His shed blood once for all on the Law of God – on the Justice of God – fulfilling it, satisfying it. Is it any wonder that cherubim are pictured staring with awe over the mercy seat atop the Ark of the Covenant?

What grace and mercy to simply be set free from Egypt and left to wander! But no, even better! To be sent with directions to a fertile land of their own! But no, even better still! To be made like angels, the servants of a kind master! But no, better yet still! We are to be ever in the arms and gracious love of God Almighty Himself – His blood-bought children!

Stop thinking of yourself as lucky or proud or deserving or an object of pity or obscurity. Let’s think of ourselves as those who know the true God, and who know why He made us and for what He made us.


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