The But Chapter: Incomprehension, Indecision, and Ignorance

October 24, 2018 at 11:12 am | Posted in Luke | 3 Comments
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There are 16 buts in Luke 9. “But” can be a cop-out word that often simply nullifies whatever we say before it. “Honey, I think you look beautiful today, BUT…” “I promise I am going to clean up the house, BUT…” However, the “buts” in Luke 9 are very instructive.

1. The But of Incomprehension

Jesus gave the disciples their instructions, and then:

And they departed, and went through the towns, preaching the gospel, and healing every where. Now Herod the tetrarch heard of all that was done by him: and he was perplexed, because that it was said of some, that John was risen from the dead;

Luke 9:6-7

Herod was baffled and confused. He didn’t seem to comprehend the ministry of Jesus and His disciples. Herod had ordered the beheading of John the Baptist, and it may be that he knew it was wrong, and that his conscience was bothering him.

And of some, that Elias had appeared; and of others, that one of the old prophets was risen again. And Herod said, John have I beheaded: but who is this, of whom I hear such things? And he desired to see him.

Luke 9:8-9 (emphasis added)

Some people were speculating that Jesus might actually be Elijah or another one of the Old Testament prophets resurrected, but Herod did not comprehend who Jesus was. Is that YOUR problem, too? You can’t really be a Christian without knowing Jesus, but a DISCIPLE needs to not only KNOW Him personally (although that is of paramount importance), but also to keep knowing more and more about Him. Disciples need to know His attributes and principles and precepts. Perhaps you aren’t following Jesus like you should, and it’s a little similar to what Herod was experiencing. Something is bothering you. You know that you need to be serving Jesus in different ways and with more passion, but have you really comprehended WHO HE IS? You are wondering: Will He leave me or forsake me? Will He forget to repay my costs and my hurts? Just how trustworthy is He? What does He think about people like me? What does He think about the people around me? Jesus does not have to be incomprehensible to us. Herod desired to SEE Him. If you desire to see Him, you can.

But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.

Hebrews 2:9 (emphasis added)

First, see Him on the Cross – a Man suffering and dying for you. You will comprehend that He loves you. Then see Him seated in glory at the Father’s right hand. You will comprehend that He is victorious.

For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren,

Hebrews 2:10-11

This promise will demolish any “but” of incomprehension that stands in your way. Jesus has suffered what you have suffered – and MORE than you have suffered – yet He is not ashamed to call you “brother” or “sister.”

2. The But of Indecision

It doesn’t always work out this way when you compare the Gospel accounts, but you can look in Luke 9 and Mark 9 and see the same incident.

And it came to pass, that on the next day, when they were come down from the hill, much people met him. And, behold, a man of the company cried out, saying, Master, I beseech thee, look upon my son: for he is mine only child. And, lo, a spirit taketh him, and he suddenly crieth out; and it teareth him that he foameth again, and bruising him hardly departeth from him. And I besought thy disciples to cast him out; and they could not.

Luke 9:37-40

Here was a child possessed by a violent demonic spirit, yet Jesus’s disciples could not cast the demon out. Mark gives a parallel account of the incident:

When Jesus saw that the people came running together, he rebuked the foul spirit, saying unto him, Thou dumb and deaf spirit, I charge thee, come out of him, and enter no more into him. And the spirit cried, and rent him sore, and came out of him: and he was as one dead; insomuch that many said, He is dead. But Jesus took him by the hand, and lifted him up; and he arose. And when he was come into the house, his disciples asked him privately, Why could not we cast him out? And he said unto them, This kind can come forth by nothing, but by prayer and fasting.

Mark 9:25-29 (emphasis added)

Now you can see why the disciples could not deal with this demonic spirit. They believed they had authority, BUT they were undecided about what was wrong. They had not prepared. How in the world are we going to know what to do when we face an unexpected spiritual battle if we haven’t been preparing by prayer and intense serious devotion to God? If I don’t meditate on His Word – in prayer, too – then I’m going to wind up on my “butt” when the first tough ministry opportunity knocks me right down.

And Jesus answering said, O faithless and perverse generation, how long shall I be with you, and suffer you? Bring thy son hither. And as he was yet a coming, the devil threw him down, and tare him. And Jesus rebuked the unclean spirit, and healed the child, and delivered him again to his father. And they were all amazed at the mighty power of God. BUT while they wondered every one at all things which Jesus did, he said unto his disciples,

Luke 9:41-44

Don’t get caught “wondering” in the “but of indecision” while it’s time to act. Be prepared.

3. The But of Ignorance

Let these sayings sink down into your ears: for the Son of man shall be delivered into the hands of men.

Luke 9:44

Jesus’s disciples knew by this time that He was referring to Himself when He used the prophetic title “Son of Man.” They also knew that “delivered into the hands of men” meant taken captive by His enemies – most likely through betrayal – for punishment, torture, and death. Why didn’t this have a bigger impact on them?

BUT they understood not this saying, and it was hid from them, that they perceived it not: and they feared to ask him of that saying.

Luke 9:45 (emphasis added)

They were ignorant of what Jesus came to do. Is that the “but” of your problem when it’s time to serve Jesus? Are you really ignorant of exactly what Jesus came to do? Was He a good role model? Yes, but you are ignorant if you think that’s the message of Jesus’s Gospel. Was He a good example – willing to serve others even to the point of laying down His life as the ultimate example? Yes, but you are ignorant if that’s what you think His real message was and is. Was He on the right track, but He just got overcome by the evil in this world, so we honor Him for “a good try?” That’s romantic and heroic, but you are ignorant if you think that’s what the Gospel of Jesus is about.

But they understood not this saying, and it was hid from them, that they perceived it not: and they feared to ask him of that saying.

Luke 9:45 (emphasis added)

We can’t be afraid of facing what Jesus really came to do. We can’t be afraid to tell people that He suffered and died, and that it was a bloody gruesome death, and that God forsook Him on the Cross and emptied the cup of wrath on His head. We’re afraid to talk about that because of its implications. Why was the death of the Son of God so awful – so horrible – so atrociously bloody? Because you and I were so wicked, so vile, so perverse, so at enmity with God, so undeserving of the love wherewith He loved us. We can’t remain ignorant of those facts, and we can’t let others “but” their way around that Truth. We needed an awesome Savior because we were awful sinners.

Next time we will look at the “buts” of immaturity and independence.

Flesh and Blood

May 11, 2015 at 2:05 pm | Posted in Common Expressions, Hebrews | 3 Comments
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Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil;

Hebrews 2:14

It was important for Jesus to become flesh and blood, so He could die and break the power of death and the power of the devil. Angels aren’t flesh and blood; they’re spirit beings.

For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this world, against spiritual wickedness in high places.

Ephesians 6:12

Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption.

I Corinthians 15:50

For this reason, if we are to inherit eternal life, we must be “born again,” and, in this second birth, we must be “born of the Spirit.”

To reveal his Son in me, that I might preach him among the heathen; immediately I conferred not with flesh and blood:

Galatians 1:16

The Apostle Paul always tried to remember not to be proud even though He was elected by God to do great things. He did not want to glory in his flesh.

And Jesus answered and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona: for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven.

Matthew 16:17

Jesus told Peter that he was blessed because his confession of faith was based on listening to God, not just on what he had seen with his flesh-and-blood eyes.

For the life of the flesh [is] in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul.

Leviticus 17:11

The Bible tells us that that thousands of years ago God told people that the life is in the blood. George Washington died after being “bled” as a means of healing, even though there was a Bible right there on his bedside table that would have refuted this so-called “science.”

He’s No Angel

April 27, 2015 at 2:50 pm | Posted in Hebrews | 9 Comments
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For if the word spoken by angels was stedfast, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompence of reward; How shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation; which at the first began to be spoken by the Lord, and was confirmed unto us by them that heard him; God also bearing them witness, both with signs and wonders, and with divers miracles, and gifts of the Holy Ghost, according to his own will?

Hebrews 2:2-3

The Word of God, prior to its cannonization in the Bible, was confirmed by signs and wonders. Many people today neglect the wonders of God’s Word, chasing after physical manifestations – visible signs and wonders – which is dangerous. Can God do today what He did in times past? No doubt about it. One of the messages of Hebrews is that Jesus Christ is the same, yesterday, today, and forever (Hebrews 13:8). However, we must beware of a tendency to ignore the lessons taught in the Bible, while speculating about some kind of modern message that is touted as more “user-friendly.” Signs and wonders confirmed the Word, but the Word is perfect today. Don’t overlook the “miracle” of the Word of God, while vainly seeking some “new” miracle today. The Bible teaches that the angels are real, and they do minister according to the will of God, but, in the ranking of Heavenly beings, there is no doubt that God – the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost – holds the highest (and only truly unique) rank.

There is a warning in Hebrews 2:3 not to neglect the salvation granted to you by God.

And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God:

Ephesians 6:17

Salvation is compared to a helmet, but a helmet is for wearing, not just having. The Hebrews to whom this book was originally written might have argued that Jesus had some authority, but He was human, and angels are above humans. Therefore, aren’t they above Jesus? The Bible clearly teaches that this is incorrect. Jesus, even in his humanity – incarnate – is still superior to the angels, in the following nonexclusive respects:

1. By His humanity He restored man’s dominion.

Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing that is not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him.

Hebrews 2:7-8

Since Adam’s sin in the Garden of Eden, man no longer completely controls the the fish, the fowl, the wild beasts, or the domesticated beasts, but Christ did.

2. Even though He was God, He tasted death.

But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.

Hebrews 2:9

No angel could conquer death, because no angel could die. Similarly, no angel could restore dominion or save lost sinners. Dominion was given to man, not angels, and Jesus did not die for fallen angels. He died for sinful men and women.

3. His humanity gave Him a unique priesthood.

Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people. For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted.

Hebrews 2:17-18

Jesus experienced the dependency of infancy. He experienced growing pains. He experienced puberty. He experienced rejection. He got tired. He got hungry. He got thirsty. He got angry. People told lies told about Him. He was falsely accused.

The word tranlated as “succour” in Hebrews 2:18 refers to what happens when a baby cries for his mother, but it also has a connotation of sympathy or empathy. Jesus – even though He was God – experienced every temptation we have, and many we haven’t, and He remained without sin. The fact that He never sinned, though, does not keep Him from identifying with my sufferings, or my feelings or sincere emotions. It is exciting to know that we have access to our High Priest at any time, and that the need for for a priestly class of human beings no longer exists.

It is good to confess our faults to one another. The Bible says to do that, but that must never take the place of a sincere time of confession with our One True High Priest.

For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin.

Hebrews 4:15

Don’t Let Go of the Rope

April 13, 2015 at 3:38 pm | Posted in Hebrews | 5 Comments
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Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let them slip.

Hebrews 2:1

My father was a great fisherman. He loved to fish, and he almost always caught a bunch (what he called “a mess”) of fish. Except when he took me along. I don’t really believe in “luck,” but, if I did, then I would say that I certainly had bad luck when it came to fishing. This may have been a contributing factor to the misery that usually accompanied these trips. On top of the lack of action, though, the real problem was the stress factor. To my dad, fishing was intense. The boat ride, the scenery, the weather, whether or not we had a snack, were completely irrelevant. A fish can’t be caught unless your hook is in the water, and there was no time to pause and reflect. Perfect casts, precise reeling speed, and impeccable hook-setting techniques were the only acceptable maneuvers, and the old man was good. He could silently drop his lure over a stump 25 feet from the boat, entice a strike, reel in a five-pound largemouth bass in ten seconds flat, remove the hook, deposit him in the ice chest, and be casting again without wiping his brow or pausing for a breath. Not me, though. Tangled lines, snagged hooks, loud-splashing, fish-spooking plops several feet from the targeted brush pile were the order of the day for me. I honestly don’t know, to this day, why he took me along. Neither of us ever had fun, and 99% of the time the trip ended in a fight.

My grandfather was a different story. When he took me fishing we always had a grand time. He liked to fish with live bait, so that even a fishing-klutz like me could watch a cork sink, and pull in a decent catch. Plus, he always seemed to know where the fish were spawning or bunched together, so we wouldn’t spend half the day casting around random stumps, brush piles, and low-hanging branches. When it was time to eat, we would stop fishing and enjoy delicious sandwiches, snacks, and icy Cokes out of glass bottles. He was patient and good-natured, quick to help me with the hook, bait, and line. Even on the occasions when we didn’t catch anything, he was in a good mood and the trip was enjoyable – with two exceptions. Once was when he let me drive his new bass boat – a story I’ll save for another day. And once when, instead of going to the lake, we went to Dorcheat Bayou.

If you’re not from the South or if you’re unfamiliar with the term “bayou,” it’s just another word for a fairly narrow river, typically with a slower current, usually found in swampy areas.

https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Revised_photo_of_Dorcheat_Bayou_in_Webster_Parish%2C_LA_MVI_2548.jpg/600px-Revised_photo_of_Dorcheat_Bayou_in_Webster_Parish%2C_LA_MVI_2548.jpg

I was probably about eight years old, and, on this particular day, my grandfather backed his trailer down the launch ramp, handed me the rope tied to the boat, let the boat float free from the trailer, then drove back up the ramp to find a place to park. My instructions were clear: Stand on the dock next to the ramp and HOLD. ON. TO. THE. ROPE.

The boat floated downstream and quickly used up all the slack in the rope, but the current wasn’t so swift that it was hard to hold on. In fact, it was a piece of cake. Pretty soon my grandfather would return on foot, pull the boat in close to the dock, and hold it steady so we could climb in and take off. The only problem was my level of focus. There were some loose pebbles on the dock. Could I skip one across the water? I’ll just put the rope down on the dock and hold it in place with my foot, so I can have both hands free. Is that a bird in that tree? Could I scare him off by throwing a rock at him? What about that cloud? It looks like an Indian shooting a bow-and-arrow. I’ll just wander over to the edge and look down into the water for a second… Here comes PawPaw. Why is he running and gesturing?

You guessed it. Turning around, I saw my grandfather’s (no doubt expensive) bass boat floating away in the distance. What does all this have to do with Hebrews 2:1? I had let my attention, and the tow rope, “slip.” As a child I thought the boat would be lost forever. (It wasn’t. Thankfully, another fisherman downstream saw it, and was kind enough to tow it back.) I’m old now. Both my father and grandfather have passed into eternity. Over the years, I’ve come to realize that, spiritually speaking, the salvation which God has given me in Christ can never “slip away.” It is secure, but the danger in letting sound Bible doctrine slip away is that a loose, unpiloted boat can be damaged if it runs aground or hits an obstacle, and other boats with which it might collide can be damaged, too. A Christian believer who has slipped out of his moorings is in danger. He still belongs to God, but he can be damaged, hurt, and he can crash into others, causing more damage.

We must not lose our focus and neglect our Christian responsibilities, even when they may seem at times as uneventful and routine as holding onto a rope that only gives off a light resistance. Prayer, Bible study, worship, church attendance are things which must be heeded with renewed focus every day and every week. We do not do these things to get rewards, but we understand that they are vital to our well-being, and to the well-being of others.

Don’t Let ’em Give You the Slip

March 23, 2015 at 1:05 pm | Posted in Common Expressions, Hebrews | 8 Comments
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Thank You, Lord, for helping us to see Your superiority, for helping us to see that You are supreme – better than Adam, better than Moses, wiser than Solomon, more holy than David, better than the angels. Thank You for blessing us. You have neither left us, nor forsaken us. Please help us never to leave, nor forsake, You. In the name of Jesus Christ I pray. Amen.

There is an admonition for us in Hebrews Chapter 2. It is really the first of five, and it’s not the sort of admonition that reads as if someone is being fussed at (the way the Holy Spirit sometimes did through Paul when writing to the Corinthians). These admonitions in Hebrews read more like warnings and encouragements, but they are still tricky things to handle. In our flesh, if a brother or sister in Christ says, “I see you’ve been getting away from the things of God…” we tend to get defensive or get our feelings hurt. We ought to pray for each other, sure, but we also, at times, have to exhort, encourage, and talk straight with each other.

My children used to listen to a cassette tape in the car by a group called the “Best Buddies.” The songs were somewhat childish, but they generally had very good reminders of Scriptural principles. One of the songs said:

Are you teachable?
Are you agreeable?
Are you being somebody nice to talk to?
Know-it-alls are often very lonely
So humble yourself and you can learn from everybody!

The Best Buddies

It’s been a good reminder for me over the years to listen more than I talk, to try to be humble, and to try not to be disagreeable, even when I do disagree.

Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let them slip.

Hebrews 2:1

You’ve probably heard the old Bible study adage, “What do you do when you see ‘therefore?’ You back up and see what it’s ‘there for.’”

But to which of the angels said he at any time, Sit on my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool? Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation?

Hebrews 1:13-14

“Because you have received the Word of God directly from the Son, and because you are the heirs of salvation, let Me,” the Holy Spirit seems to be saying, “encourage you with a warning: Give heed to what you have learned, lest you let it slip.” In other words, don’t slip up in reading God’s Word, in studying God’s Word, in meditating on God’s word, in obeying God’s Word. Our attention has a tendency to “drift,” and something that’s not tied down or held in place, can “drift away,” but the Bible is telling me in Hebrews 2:1 that the onus is on me – on the one doing the holding – not to let things “slip” – to “heed,” to pay attention to what I’m supposed to be holding. If you’ve been to a marina, you’ve seen “slips” – those things to which people tie their boats so they won’t float away.

We have the same admonition concerning strong doctrine.

Holding fast the faithful word as he hath been taught, that he may be able by sound doctrine both to exhort and to convince the gainsayers.

Titus 1:9

Warning Sign #6: Visualization Techniques

July 2, 2010 at 12:46 pm | Posted in Biblical Eyesight, John, When Good Preachers Go Bad | 13 Comments
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The false teaching of the prosperity gospel is partly about greed. Therefore, if you expect the prosperity preacher to talk about “claiming” and “grabbing” and “seizing” you will not be disappointed. Whether it’s good health, popularity with the world, or just plain old filthy lucre, though, the prosperity preacher knows one thing:

You have to see it before you reach it!

Good Preacher Going Bad

Speaking “words of faith” are all well and good. But if you’ve been speaking to your checkbook, your doctor’s appointment book, and your Facebook for a long time, and you still don’t have as many dollars, healings, or shallow friends as you would like – it just may be that you are not “visualizing” hard enough!

I have heard visualizing techniques attributed to all sorts of Biblical characters – from Abraham to Jabez to David to Zacchaeus. To be fair, Zacchaeus did seem to be a little (no pun intended) bit of a visualizer.

“See there!” says the prosperity preacher, “The Bible does teach that we are supposed to see what we want, and then reach for it!”

Not so fast. Zacchaeus had a desire to see, alright – but a desire to see what… or should I say Whom?

And he sought to see Jesus who he was; and could not for the press, because he was little of stature.

Luke 19:3, emphasis added

Despite what the prosperity teacher tells you, remember: Our help comes from seeing Jesus – not the personal comforts we can concoct in our own imaginations.

So when they had rowed about five and twenty or thirty furlongs, they see Jesus walking on the sea, and drawing nigh unto the ship: and they were afraid.

John 6:19, emphasis added

The same came therefore to Philip, which was of Bethsaida of Galilee, and desired him, saying, Sir, we would see Jesus.

John 12:21, emphasis added

But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.

Hebrews 2:9, emphasis added

Big Words of the Christian Life: Propitiation

March 11, 2010 at 11:35 am | Posted in big words of the Christian life | 23 Comments
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Here are three Big Words of the Christian Life:

*Justification: the act of God, Who, by grace, declares sinners who have believed on Jesus Christ to be righteous

*Adoption: the act of God by which He grants believers an adult standing in His family

*Regeneration: the act of God which grants a second, spiritual birth, and new life, to the person who has trusted Jesus Christ as his Savior

Here is a fourth Big Word of the Christian Life:

*Propitiation: The sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the Cross which made it so that God could be both merciful and just in saving lost sinners

That is Propitiation defined. Here is Propitiation declared:

Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God;

Romans 3:25

God and Jesus work together in everything having do with salvation, so do not get the idea that God “set Jesus forth” because He was angry at Him. They are one God – one God in three Persons. (The Holy Spirit is also included in the Godhead.) Propitiation in general means to appease wrath, but God and Jesus sort of agreed that the Son would be the sacrifice for sin. Jesus did not plead with an angry God Who was prepared to destroy everyone. This was God’s plan, but God’s holiness and justice and wrath do require blood for the remission of sins. “Through faith in his blood,” says Romans 3:25, and to declare His (God’s) righteousness. Propitiation is the only way God could still be righteous and forgive sinners.

The sins that were past – the sins of the Old Testament and from the beginning of the world – had not been forgiven. They had been passed over through the forbearance of God.

Propitiation defined
Propitiation declared
Now,
Propitiation demanded:

Jesus Himself was the propitiation – and propitiation was the transaction between God and Jesus. Propitiation was the only possible meeting and satisfaction of God’s love and mercy with His wrath and justice.

Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people.

Hebrews 2:17

Jesus, the great High Priest, did what no earthly priest could ever accomplish in the Levitical system. He fully atoned for the sins of all God’s people for all time. Under the Levitical system of propitiation the high priest carried the blood into the Holy of Holies and sprinkled it on the mercy seat, between the images of angels looking down at the top of the ark, the dimensions of which represented the Law of God. God’s Law had been broken, and only His Own blood would satisfy His wrath and the curse caused by the breaking of His Law.

My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous: And he is the propitiation for our sins: and not for ours only, but also for the sins of the whole world.

I John 2:1-2, emphasis added

If you have a Bible version that uses “sacrifice” or “atoning sacrifice” you are missing out on a big part of the richness of what God is telling us here. Our Advocate with the Father is not just some heavenly lawyer. He’s not some created being – not even an angel. He is Jesus Christ the righteous – and when God’s justice demands satisfaction for the penalty of sins, He not only brings payment in to the mercy seat, He is the payment – the bloody sacrifice that is demanded.

Propitiation defined
Propitiation declared
Propitiation demanded
And here’s the part that’s even richer:
Propitiation desired:

Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that he loved us, and sent his Son to be the propitiation for our sins.

I John 4:10

God loved us – we did not love Him. He desired us – we did not desire Him. He sent His Son – not only to make the sacrifice, but to be the sacrifice. That’s propitiation! God did not just “demonstrate” His love. (Romans 5:8) He commended His love – He sent His love – His Son! Herein is love – do you want to know what love is? Do you want a motivation to be loving?

Propitiation defined: Tell people about it.
Propitiation declared: Look to Jesus whenever you don’t feel loving. In fact, look to Him all the time.
Propitiation demanded: Remember what our sin cost God.
Propitiation desired: Remember that God was not trapped by some mysterious cosmic law into doing what He did for us. He truly loves us.

Let’s love like Him – giving, providing, encouraging with words and deeds, covering the sins of others, fixing other people’s messes, getting involved in other people’s problems.

John Piper’s S.W.I.M. Prayer

October 22, 2009 at 8:51 am | Posted in Hebrews, Quotes | 3 Comments
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Father, we fear our deadly fondness for floating toward the falls when we ought to be swimming against the current. Oh, God, have mercy to waken us again and again to the perils of drifting in the Christian life. Help us heed Hebrews 2:1… Woe to the drifters in a world where all the current is toward destruction!

John Piper

Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let them slip.

Hebrews 2:1


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