Spiritually Disabled

August 16, 2017 at 3:24 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Traditionally it has come to be known as the doctrine of “total depravity.” Stated simply, it is the idea that, because of the sinful condition into which all human beings are born, our moral default mode is that we are depraved, and lack the ability to love, trust, and worship God of our own volition. However, some theologians, fearing that the words “total” and “depravity” will be interpreted to mean that every human being, unless He is supernaturally changed by God, always does the absolute worst thing he can do in every conceivable situation, would prefer to use different terminology. Because it can often be demonstrated that even the worst sinners could sin more frequently, and in worse ways, than they are presently sinning or have sinned in the past, the term “radical depravity” is offered as a substitute for “total depravity.”

However, this might also require some explaining. We tend to think of the word “radical” as an adjective which refers to something “extreme.” A kid who backflips off his speeding skateboard into the back of moving truck has done something “radical.”

radical skateboard

A political group that wants the government pay for birth control may be called “liberal,” but a group that wants the government to pay for genital mutilation surgery is “radically” liberal. This is not the sense that theologians want to convey when speaking of “radical depravity.” What they are getting at is the sense of the Latin word for “root:” radix. A person who is “radically” depraved is a person who is depraved down to the “root:” the most basic foundational level of his ontology. There is within him, preventing him from making God-honoring moral choices, a core of depravity which skews or perverts his thinking, his emotions, and his very will, toward evil rather than good.

One of the most marvelous things about God’s redeeming grace is that when He enables a person to trust Jesus Christ unto salvation, the Holy Spirit regenerates that person – completely changing his ontology, and giving him a new ability that he did not before possess: the ability to truly love and serve God.

The label “disabled,” when applied to someone who has a physical or mental infirmity, has become controversial and has the potential to offend, so I’m not trying to disparage anyone’s physical condition, but the fact is, apart from the miraculous work of God, our “natural” minds and natures are truly disabled by the consequences of sin.

Because the carnal mind is enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be.

Romans 8:7

We get frustrated at people who disobey the law of God, including (far more frequently than we like to admit) ourselves. But we have to remember, people operating in their “carnality” – in their “flesh” – do not obey God because they CAN NOT obey God. They are totally disabled. Some physical and mental disabilities can be treated and even cured. However, our spiritual disability can ONLY be overcome by the Lord Jesus Christ.

There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death.

Romans 8:1-2

Advertisements

Catechism Question 6

May 16, 2014 at 10:49 am | Posted in Children's Bible Catechism | 13 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Question 4: How was everything when God created it?
Answer: It was very good.
Prove it.
Genesis 1:31

Question 5: What went wrong with everything God created?
Answer: Sin brought the curse of death into the world.
Prove it.
Romans 5:12

Question 6: What is wrong with you?
Answer: I was born a sinner, and I have sinned against God.
Prove it.

Behold, I was shapen in iniquity; and in sin did my mother conceive me.

Psalm 51:5

You may remember a popular television commercial from several years ago. A dad finds marijuana in his son’s room, and confronts him about it. Finding the son less than forthcoming, the dad demands in an angry self-righteous voice, “Where did you learn to do this?”

https://i2.wp.com/i.ytimg.com/vi/KUXb7do9C-w/hqdefault.jpg

This prompts the son to respond indignantly, “I learned it by watching you!”

When you tell your child that he or she is a sinner you will be violating every self-help book, counseling guideline, and child psychology tactic known to man concerning building up a child’s self-esteem. But you will also be obeying the Bible, so it must done. And like the sullen boy who blamed his drug use on his dad’s own example, you, too, may get the same question thrown back in your face. “I’m a sinner, you say? Well, what about you, Dad? What about you, Mom?”

And the only right response is, “Yes, me too. Everyone is a sinner.” Which is a great lead-in to be able to explain that no one can stop sinning on his or her own. It is in our fallen nature, and fallen sinners need help from God.

Other verses to consider:

And the LORD smelled a sweet savour; and the LORD said in his heart, I will not again curse the ground any more for man’s sake; for the imagination of man’s heart [is] evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done.

Genesis 8:21

Foolishness [is] bound in the heart of a child; [but] the rod of correction shall drive it far from him.

Proverbs 22:15


Entries and comments feeds.